It was one of those nights. like day but darker...
© meliapond

A long time ago, in the underground realm, where there are no lies or pain, there lived a Princess who dreamed of the human world. She dreamed of blue skies, soft breeze, and sunshine. One day, eluding her keepers, the Princess escaped. Once outside, the brightness blinded her and erased every trace of the past from her memory. She forgot who she was and where she came from. Her body suffered cold, sickness, and pain. Eventually, she died. However, her father, the King, always knew…

(Source: vesperlynds)

posted 10 hours ago with 3,147 notes

lampsandtoasters:

kapooyah:

bellabracha:

what even IS american culture

it’s just a big ball of different cultures with no set value 

i don’t get it

image

this might just be the most accurate discription of america ever

(Source: cockedtail)

posted 10 hours ago with 183,228 notes

valerieparker:

okay but hear me out

  • male jaeger pilots getting extra moody when their female co-pilots are on their periods
  • male jaeger pilots getting to experience cramps via the drift and their faces go ashy and white and they have to clench their jaws to keep it together
  • male jaeger pilots providing small comforts to their female co-pilots because they know what they need without having to ask
  • male jaeger pilots calling out other pilots for their misogynistic shit because NAH BRO YOU DON’T FUCKIN KNOW
  • male jaeger pilots being able to tell when their female partner is pregnant before they can and either having to break it to them up front or find ways to give them hints
  • Fierce lady pilots with giant teddybear dudepilots
  • ヽ(๏∀๏ )ノ
posted 10 hours ago with 6,647 notes
gymleaderkarkat:


What are you so afraid of!?

I’m REALLY sorry but it looks like they’re about to rap battle

gymleaderkarkat:

What are you so afraid of!?

I’m REALLY sorry but it looks like they’re about to rap battle

(Source: four-big-idiots)

posted 10 hours ago with 400,930 notes

(Source: wonderous-world)

posted 11 hours ago with 8,350 notes

quiero-poder-ser-feliz:

Mike Prysner, iraq war veteran and anti-war activist.

posted 11 hours ago with 33,704 notes
darkesthorizons:

neptuneisforlovers:

ITS NOT SEWING SUPPLIES!

My question is how does every single person identify with this, is it like a secret rule to use those for sewing supplies?

darkesthorizons:

neptuneisforlovers:

ITS NOT SEWING SUPPLIES!

My question is how does every single person identify with this, is it like a secret rule to use those for sewing supplies?

(Source: ofela)

posted 12 hours ago with 472,928 notes
via morismako · © ofela

herspanic:

I would betray all of you in the Hunger Games 

(Source: ouroboros-schwarz)

posted 12 hours ago with 63,827 notes

Why the Winter Soldier is Less an Embodiment of Soviet Russia Than I Thought, or: Bucky Barnes, American Cold War Anxieties, and You

puelhathnofury:

wizzard890:

As you might imagine, I walked into Captain America 2 ready to get my Soviet Russia on. The Winter Soldier run is one of my favorites in—well, in any comic, really, and from what I’d seen in the trailers and whatnot, it looked like we were going to get a heaping dose of what makes that series so special and so sobering: the bloodstained underbelly of Soviet international politics, a glimpse at the way men and women were fed into the meat grinder of the State, pulped for the greater glory of their nation. In Bucky we’d see a drafted soldier kidnapped, brainwashed, and streamlined into the perfect machine. Not an ideal Soviet man, far from it; but a tool, utilitarian and dispassionate, with the five-pointed martial star on his shoulder; the awful triumph of the State over so-called human frailty.

And we did, we got all of that—insofar that you can’t have a Winter Soldier without those things. But as I watched, it became increasingly clear that this movie wasn’t looking to talk about the Soviet Union. There is a reason Bucky only speaks Russian once in the entire film. There’s a reason he’s never addressed in it. There’s a reason his code name is drawn from an investigation into one of the ugliest chapters of American history. And there is a reason that the movie takes this snarling, mechanized, indiscriminate killing machine and explicitly sets him up as Captain America’s other half. 

I’ve seen some reviews going after the film for pulling its punches, of holding up the Greatest Generation as America’s past, and a polluted security branch as its future, absolving it of responsibility for its actions in both cases. It’s HYDRA now and “sacrifices for freedom” then; why aren’t we interrogating ourselves a little harder?

My answer to that is: we did, and the movie is named after what we found.

The Winter Soldier is concerned with security and international supremacy, and the moral compromises America has made (and continues to make) in pursuit of both. It draws a straight line from WWII America to the modern day, where “we did some things we weren’t proud of” becomes drone warfare and Big Brother. Steve is at one end of this timeline, Nick Fury at the other. There’s a chasm of about fifty years between the two points. That’s where the Winter Soldier steps in. 

This film is haunted by an American war, yes. But not the one Steve fought in. The Cold War was “a battle for the soul of mankind”, waged across millions of hearts and minds, and it’s a patched-over burn in the American psyche, barely healed and still tender to the touch. We emerged on the other side of forty-four years as the world’s one and only superpower. And it fucking cost us.

McCarthyism saw Americans turning on one another, fueled by snarling, indiscriminate paranoia. Operation Paperclip recruited Nazi scientists to keep German technology out of Soviet hands. Vietnam, with its thousands dead, was fought to keep the dominoes of Communism from falling across Asia. America, augmented by an unimaginable weapon and ruthlessly militarized, spied, ordered assassinations, irradiated its own children, and dragged the world to the brink of nuclear holocaust. All for the sake of security.  

The Winter Soldier is that America.

Inhuman, bionic, unfeeling, unthinking, the perfect weapon: a creature of progress, powered by pure ideology. The mind wipes? Decades of propaganda in its purest, most undiluted form, administered directly to the brain. The arm? I know a nuclear metaphor when I see one.

If Cap is the potential of America, what we should never stop striving for, the Winter Soldier is what became of us when we fell desperately short. He is what we did to ourselves.

In many ways this film is a ghost story, and like all good ghost stories, it holds up the tragedy of our mistakes and begs us not to repeat them. What SHIELD proposes—Project Insight—is assured destruction, a level of control over a population not exercised since we were staring Russia down over a launch pad. And so the Winter Soldier appears, the long cold shadow of America’s past, and crashes into the hope for its future with the ring of a metal fist against a shield.

Cap can’t destroy him, what’s done is done. Bucky can’t be unwounded, or given back his stolen time; the blood on his hands won’t be scrubbed out. But they can walk slowly together, one helping the other stand. 

Steve can’t progress without Bucky, just as, the film seems to say, America itself is doomed to fester unless it looks to its past and acknowledges what it has done; the things it has ground into dust in the name of a higher cause. In the MCU, the only way Captain America’s country will move forward is if it swears to never, ever go back.

Leave it to Emily to knock this meta out of the park. <3 

posted 12 hours ago with 1,549 notes
via vstahl · © wizzard890